Curbs on young drivers considered

Braintree and Witham Times: A restriction on young drivers carrying passengers for six or nine months after passing their test is being considered by the Government A restriction on young drivers carrying passengers for six or nine months after passing their test is being considered by the Government

Young drivers may face a ban on carrying passengers who are not members of their family as the Government seeks to cut the number of deaths on the road involving teenagers, it has been reported.

Other measures which the Government could look at include banning novice drivers from carrying passengers at all, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin told the newspaper that he would consider measures put forward by the Association of British Insurers which could cut the number of accidents involving young motorists.

"I read regular reports where three or four young people have been killed in a car, and it's a new driver, and you wonder what happened," Mr McLoughlin told the newspaper. "When I talk to young people who have recently passed their test, what they say sometimes is that peer pressure is put on them to go fast, to show off.

"They are not anticipating an accident, but something goes wrong. They are not drivers with a huge amount of experience by the very fact of their being new drivers. I think we have got to look at that.

"There is a suggestion as to whether you should look at a restriction whether anyone could carry passengers for six or nine months when they have first passed their test.

"There are suggestions about them only perhaps being allowed to take a family member to drive a car when you are learning, you have to have a qualified driver in the car. So these are all sorts of areas that I think we can look at."

According to the Association of British Insurers one in eight drivers is under 25, but they account for one third of the number of people who die on the country's roads, the paper reports. It estimates that an 18-year-old driver is three times more likely to be involved in a crash than a motorist 30 years older.

In 2011, drivers between 17 and 19 were involved in 12,000 crashes, of which more than half resulted in serious or fatal injuries.

The association has also called for a curfew banning young drivers from the roads at night.

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Comments (2)

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12:37pm Sat 17 Nov 12

itsallgammon says...

From my observations, it seems that very few motorists who break the law by using mobiles, not wearing seat belts, not taxed, insured or having an MOT, are ever stopped much less arrested by our overstretched police. It is true that a few are seen on high profile TV documentaries, but most just carry on getting away with it. One million uninsured cars on the road for example.

I would be fascinated to hear just how it is proposed that this measure will be policed - short of stopping every car driven by a teenager (or even young driver in case they are teenage!)

Time for thinking out of the box. Compulsory Third Party Insurance charged against fuel tax. The Government can surely afford it if one balances the cost to the nation NHS etc of the real cost of uninsured drivers against it. Then the choice is either ban all young drivers until they are 25 at least or accept that they have the right to drive and get off their backs.

There seems to me to be a distinct parallel here with the way smoking tobacco (not yet illegal!) is legislated against. Like young drivers, you're not breaking the law and we like the revenue raised from you but we are going to make life impossible
From my observations, it seems that very few motorists who break the law by using mobiles, not wearing seat belts, not taxed, insured or having an MOT, are ever stopped much less arrested by our overstretched police. It is true that a few are seen on high profile TV documentaries, but most just carry on getting away with it. One million uninsured cars on the road for example. I would be fascinated to hear just how it is proposed that this measure will be policed - short of stopping every car driven by a teenager (or even young driver in case they are teenage!) Time for thinking out of the box. Compulsory Third Party Insurance charged against fuel tax. The Government can surely afford it if one balances the cost to the nation NHS etc of the real cost of uninsured drivers against it. Then the choice is either ban all young drivers until they are 25 at least or accept that they have the right to drive and get off their backs. There seems to me to be a distinct parallel here with the way smoking tobacco (not yet illegal!) is legislated against. Like young drivers, you're not breaking the law and we like the revenue raised from you but we are going to make life impossible itsallgammon
  • Score: 0

12:38pm Sat 17 Nov 12

itsallgammon says...

From my observations, it seems that very few motorists who break the law by using mobiles, not wearing seat belts, not taxed, insured or having an MOT, are ever stopped much less arrested by our overstretched police. It is true that a few are seen on high profile TV documentaries, but most just carry on getting away with it. One million uninsured cars on the road for example.

I would be fascinated to hear just how it is proposed that this measure will be policed - short of stopping every car driven by a teenager (or even young driver in case they are teenage!)

Time for thinking out of the box. Compulsory Third Party Insurance charged against fuel tax. The Government can surely afford it if one balances the cost to the nation NHS etc of the real cost of uninsured drivers against it. Then the choice is either ban all young drivers until they are 25 at least or accept that they have the right to drive and get off their backs.

There seems to me to be a distinct parallel here with the way smoking tobacco (not yet illegal!) is legislated against. Like young drivers, you're not breaking the law and we like the revenue raised from you but we are going to make life impossible
From my observations, it seems that very few motorists who break the law by using mobiles, not wearing seat belts, not taxed, insured or having an MOT, are ever stopped much less arrested by our overstretched police. It is true that a few are seen on high profile TV documentaries, but most just carry on getting away with it. One million uninsured cars on the road for example. I would be fascinated to hear just how it is proposed that this measure will be policed - short of stopping every car driven by a teenager (or even young driver in case they are teenage!) Time for thinking out of the box. Compulsory Third Party Insurance charged against fuel tax. The Government can surely afford it if one balances the cost to the nation NHS etc of the real cost of uninsured drivers against it. Then the choice is either ban all young drivers until they are 25 at least or accept that they have the right to drive and get off their backs. There seems to me to be a distinct parallel here with the way smoking tobacco (not yet illegal!) is legislated against. Like young drivers, you're not breaking the law and we like the revenue raised from you but we are going to make life impossible itsallgammon
  • Score: 0
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