MP condemns "shameful" strike plans

Braintree and Witham Times: Priti Patel said union chiefs are "out of touch" Priti Patel said union chiefs are "out of touch"

An MP has condemned firefighters, teachers and local government workers planning to take part in a “shameful” national strike tomorrow.

The joint action is likely to be the biggest public sector strike since 2010 with members from several large unions participating in the walkout.

Witham MP Priti Patel said: “It’s shameful that trade unions want to disrupt learning in our schools and withdraw frontline services like rubbish collections.

“Pupils, parents and the general public who rely on these services should not have to suffer because of the political games of militant union leaders.

“Out of touch fat cat trade union barons on six-figure salaries are behaving disgracefully by trying to force their members to lose a day’s pay in their desperate attempt to score political points.”

A public sector pay freeze was introduced in 2010 followed by a 1% pay rise in 2012, but with inflation at 1.5% workers say this amounts to a pay cut.

Refuse collections across the district are likely to be affected as council lorry drivers belonging to the GMB union take strike action.

Doug Rigby, of the Braintree GMB, said: “This is not an attack on Braintree district council because I think they have been very good to us, or on the residents.

“Nobody wants to lose money but we have been losing money for a long time because we haven’t had a pay rise.”

Agnes Bishop, secretary of Braintree and District NUT, said schools may be forced to close.

She said: “We are not just fighting for our pay and pensions, it is the education of our students that is concerning us. They are expecting us to work until we are 68, which will impact on the student’s learning.

“We don't want to strike but it is the only thing left, we don't do it lightly because we all lose a day’s pay.”

In addition to this week’s walkout the Fire Brigades Union has announced a series of 15 strikes taking place over eight consecutive days starting on July 14.

The firefighter’s strike is part of a long-running battle with the government over changes to pensions.

Comments (6)

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3:01pm Wed 9 Jul 14

geoff1957 says...

its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.
its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government. geoff1957
  • Score: 2

4:31pm Wed 9 Jul 14

keith_l says...

geoff1957 wrote:
its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.
Realistically, do you think many trade union members voted Tory? The people who voted her in are more likely to be the vicitims of this strike: Tax payers not getting the services that they pay for, parents having to arrange childcare or take a day off work due to school closures, etc.

It is a fact of our excellent (yes) NHS that people are living longer. Therefore, if we retire at 65 then our pension funds are inadequate. This affects both public and private sector workers. Priavte sector workers have an increasingly later pension age to look forward to, so why can't public employees? (Or to put it another way, why should I carry on working beyond 65 and paying taxes to support public sector workers retiring younger than me?)
[quote][p][bold]geoff1957[/bold] wrote: its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.[/p][/quote]Realistically, do you think many trade union members voted Tory? The people who voted her in are more likely to be the vicitims of this strike: Tax payers not getting the services that they pay for, parents having to arrange childcare or take a day off work due to school closures, etc. It is a fact of our excellent (yes) NHS that people are living longer. Therefore, if we retire at 65 then our pension funds are inadequate. This affects both public and private sector workers. Priavte sector workers have an increasingly later pension age to look forward to, so why can't public employees? (Or to put it another way, why should I carry on working beyond 65 and paying taxes to support public sector workers retiring younger than me?) keith_l
  • Score: 4

5:24pm Wed 9 Jul 14

RicoSousa says...

keith_l wrote:
geoff1957 wrote:
its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.
Realistically, do you think many trade union members voted Tory? The people who voted her in are more likely to be the vicitims of this strike: Tax payers not getting the services that they pay for, parents having to arrange childcare or take a day off work due to school closures, etc.

It is a fact of our excellent (yes) NHS that people are living longer. Therefore, if we retire at 65 then our pension funds are inadequate. This affects both public and private sector workers. Priavte sector workers have an increasingly later pension age to look forward to, so why can't public employees? (Or to put it another way, why should I carry on working beyond 65 and paying taxes to support public sector workers retiring younger than me?)
This strike is not about pensions?
[quote][p][bold]keith_l[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]geoff1957[/bold] wrote: its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.[/p][/quote]Realistically, do you think many trade union members voted Tory? The people who voted her in are more likely to be the vicitims of this strike: Tax payers not getting the services that they pay for, parents having to arrange childcare or take a day off work due to school closures, etc. It is a fact of our excellent (yes) NHS that people are living longer. Therefore, if we retire at 65 then our pension funds are inadequate. This affects both public and private sector workers. Priavte sector workers have an increasingly later pension age to look forward to, so why can't public employees? (Or to put it another way, why should I carry on working beyond 65 and paying taxes to support public sector workers retiring younger than me?)[/p][/quote]This strike is not about pensions? RicoSousa
  • Score: 1

8:05am Thu 10 Jul 14

geoff1957 says...

Thats a bit of an old style attiude comment, about who votes for who, talk about type cast ??? The strike is not soley about pensions, but more, the lack of a decent wage increment, so ...the victims.. as he put it can have a decent standard of living, as for pensions, maybe he should think of all the top bosses, both in private & public sectors, who have milked the pension system over the years, and who retire on extorsionate pensions, with super benefits, that the working person can only dream of, this why the pension pots are running dry, people are living longer, so why should they not enjoy what they have paid into over the course of their working lives.
Thats a bit of an old style attiude comment, about who votes for who, talk about type cast ??? The strike is not soley about pensions, but more, the lack of a decent wage increment, so ...the victims.. as he put it can have a decent standard of living, as for pensions, maybe he should think of all the top bosses, both in private & public sectors, who have milked the pension system over the years, and who retire on extorsionate pensions, with super benefits, that the working person can only dream of, this why the pension pots are running dry, people are living longer, so why should they not enjoy what they have paid into over the course of their working lives. geoff1957
  • Score: 2

9:47am Thu 10 Jul 14

keith_l says...

RicoSousa wrote:
keith_l wrote:
geoff1957 wrote:
its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.
Realistically, do you think many trade union members voted Tory? The people who voted her in are more likely to be the vicitims of this strike: Tax payers not getting the services that they pay for, parents having to arrange childcare or take a day off work due to school closures, etc.

It is a fact of our excellent (yes) NHS that people are living longer. Therefore, if we retire at 65 then our pension funds are inadequate. This affects both public and private sector workers. Priavte sector workers have an increasingly later pension age to look forward to, so why can't public employees? (Or to put it another way, why should I carry on working beyond 65 and paying taxes to support public sector workers retiring younger than me?)
This strike is not about pensions?
This strike is about a number of issues, the most significant of which is a change to the age at which public sector pensions are paid from 65 to 67 (lower ages for emergency services). Another is a 1% cap on pay rises following 2 or 3 years of pay freezes - just like many private sector workers have to endure.
[quote][p][bold]RicoSousa[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]keith_l[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]geoff1957[/bold] wrote: its alright for mp.s to award themselves a large wage increase, while they tell the rest of us, that we probably won't get a pay rise. come on Priti Patel, get real and support the people that most likely voted you into government.[/p][/quote]Realistically, do you think many trade union members voted Tory? The people who voted her in are more likely to be the vicitims of this strike: Tax payers not getting the services that they pay for, parents having to arrange childcare or take a day off work due to school closures, etc. It is a fact of our excellent (yes) NHS that people are living longer. Therefore, if we retire at 65 then our pension funds are inadequate. This affects both public and private sector workers. Priavte sector workers have an increasingly later pension age to look forward to, so why can't public employees? (Or to put it another way, why should I carry on working beyond 65 and paying taxes to support public sector workers retiring younger than me?)[/p][/quote]This strike is not about pensions?[/p][/quote]This strike is about a number of issues, the most significant of which is a change to the age at which public sector pensions are paid from 65 to 67 (lower ages for emergency services). Another is a 1% cap on pay rises following 2 or 3 years of pay freezes - just like many private sector workers have to endure. keith_l
  • Score: 2

10:02am Thu 10 Jul 14

keith_l says...

geoff1957 wrote:
Thats a bit of an old style attiude comment, about who votes for who, talk about type cast ??? The strike is not soley about pensions, but more, the lack of a decent wage increment, so ...the victims.. as he put it can have a decent standard of living, as for pensions, maybe he should think of all the top bosses, both in private & public sectors, who have milked the pension system over the years, and who retire on extorsionate pensions, with super benefits, that the working person can only dream of, this why the pension pots are running dry, people are living longer, so why should they not enjoy what they have paid into over the course of their working lives.
Geoff clearly does not understand how pension funds work. They are ring-fenced. The top bosses almost always have separate pension funds which they pay up to 50% of their salaries into, either directly or through their companies as part of their negotiated salary and benefit packages. Worker pay into separate pension funds.

The reason that pension funds are struggling are two-fold. Firstly, they are invesment based and all investments suffered as part ofthe global economic downturn and are only just recovering to the level that they were around 5 years ago. Secondly, life expectancy is increasing so pension funds have to pay out for longer. My grandparents generation typically lived to 70 - my generation will average at least 80, so that is three times the pension payout if retiring at 65.

At present public sector employers are having to budget to pay a higher percentage into their staff's pension funds, often with frozen or reduced income from which to do so. This will make up the defecit over a few years.
[quote][p][bold]geoff1957[/bold] wrote: Thats a bit of an old style attiude comment, about who votes for who, talk about type cast ??? The strike is not soley about pensions, but more, the lack of a decent wage increment, so ...the victims.. as he put it can have a decent standard of living, as for pensions, maybe he should think of all the top bosses, both in private & public sectors, who have milked the pension system over the years, and who retire on extorsionate pensions, with super benefits, that the working person can only dream of, this why the pension pots are running dry, people are living longer, so why should they not enjoy what they have paid into over the course of their working lives.[/p][/quote]Geoff clearly does not understand how pension funds work. They are ring-fenced. The top bosses almost always have separate pension funds which they pay up to 50% of their salaries into, either directly or through their companies as part of their negotiated salary and benefit packages. Worker pay into separate pension funds. The reason that pension funds are struggling are two-fold. Firstly, they are invesment based and all investments suffered as part ofthe global economic downturn and are only just recovering to the level that they were around 5 years ago. Secondly, life expectancy is increasing so pension funds have to pay out for longer. My grandparents generation typically lived to 70 - my generation will average at least 80, so that is three times the pension payout if retiring at 65. At present public sector employers are having to budget to pay a higher percentage into their staff's pension funds, often with frozen or reduced income from which to do so. This will make up the defecit over a few years. keith_l
  • Score: 1

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