Woman's anger after agonising wait for an ambulance

Braintree and Witham Times: Woman's anger after agonising wait for an ambulance Woman's anger after agonising wait for an ambulance

A woman is furious she was left waiting in agony for an ambulance for almost an hour after falling and breaking her ankle in three places.

Julia Tyrell was on her way home from the shops earlier this month when she slipped off a kerb in Queens Road, Braintree, and fell to the ground, landing heavily on her ankle.

A passer-by called an ambulance at 12.34pm but, despite a number of follow up calls, it wasn’t until 1.28pm that one finally arrived.

Ms Tyrell was taken to Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford, where she spent ten days.

The 57-year-old had to have pins and a plate put in her foot and is now recovering at home in Kings Road, Braintree.

An East of England Ambulance Service spokesman apologised for the delay, which was caused because the original ambulance was diverted to someone with chest pains.

See the Times for the full story

Comments (1)

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9:24am Sat 22 Mar 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

I’d like to ask, “Just what is the thrust of this ‘news’ article meant to be"?

Is it to highlight the fact that this (self-opinionated?) lady is in a state abject fury because from her point of view she has been treated in a disgraceful manner by not being treated as though she were in a dire life threatening condition and deemed - as a matter or right - to be a greater priority than others who (in the eyes of the professionals) were clearly in far greater need of immediate medical attention?

Or is the article somehow intended to stir discontent amongst the myriad of half-baked ill-informed hoi polloi and thereby mischievously further foment the incessant whinging about our hard pressed (but nevertheless pretty darned good) medical services that they so delight in forever criticizing .

In seems to me that she received a very good overall service. Within an hour of her unforeseen brush with gravity she was swiftly on the way to a well-equipped hospital where she clearly received superb specialist surgical attention and ten days’ aftercare.

I have had two occasions in the last three years which required my unplanned transportation by ambulance to Accident and Emergency. On both of them it took around forty minutes to be picked up because the ambulance, once en-route to me was diverted to more serious cases.

What is there to complain about that? I knew I wasn’t dying and quite honestly having to endure an extra twenty minutes of tender ministrations by the lovely Tesco First Aid Lady and an equally lovely passing Nurse - who sadly I never got to thank – wasn’t exactly a particularly unpleasant experience.

We are too fond of being ready to complain about a fantastic overall service that whilst admittedly could always be improved (with a magical injection of non-existent funding) but is nevertheless beyond the wildest dreams of so many other occupants who share this planet with us.
I’d like to ask, “Just what is the thrust of this ‘news’ article meant to be"? Is it to highlight the fact that this (self-opinionated?) lady is in a state abject fury because from her point of view she has been treated in a disgraceful manner by not being treated as though she were in a dire life threatening condition and deemed - as a matter or right - to be a greater priority than others who (in the eyes of the professionals) were clearly in far greater need of immediate medical attention? Or is the article somehow intended to stir discontent amongst the myriad of half-baked ill-informed hoi polloi and thereby mischievously further foment the incessant whinging about our hard pressed (but nevertheless pretty darned good) medical services that they so delight in forever criticizing . In seems to me that she received a very good overall service. Within an hour of her unforeseen brush with gravity she was swiftly on the way to a well-equipped hospital where she clearly received superb specialist surgical attention and ten days’ aftercare. I have had two occasions in the last three years which required my unplanned transportation by ambulance to Accident and Emergency. On both of them it took around forty minutes to be picked up because the ambulance, once en-route to me was diverted to more serious cases. What is there to complain about that? I knew I wasn’t dying and quite honestly having to endure an extra twenty minutes of tender ministrations by the lovely Tesco First Aid Lady and an equally lovely passing Nurse - who sadly I never got to thank – wasn’t exactly a particularly unpleasant experience. We are too fond of being ready to complain about a fantastic overall service that whilst admittedly could always be improved (with a magical injection of non-existent funding) but is nevertheless beyond the wildest dreams of so many other occupants who share this planet with us. OMPITA [Intl]
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