Unison raises concerns as private firm wins hospital transport deal

Unison raises concerns as private firm wins hospital transport deal

Unison raises concerns as private firm wins hospital transport deal

First published in News

A union claims patient care has been put at risk after a private firm was handed a contract to provide non-emergency transport to and from hospital.

Mid Essex Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has handed ERS Medical a five year contract to take over the service from the East of England Ambulance Service from the start of April.

The CCG commissions healthcare for the Braintree, Chelmsford and Maldon districts.

Unison regional organiser Tim Roberts said: “The public expects key health services to be run by the NHS and not some private company that prioritises shareholder profit over patient care.”

A CCG spokesman said: "Patient safety is of paramount importance to the CCG in all the services it commissions on behalf of the people it serves in mid Essex.

"Patients can be assured that they will receive a safe and high standard patient transport service."

He added: "The opportunity to tender was open to all sectors, including NHS and private organisations, in line with national procurement regulations."

Comments (4)

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3:27pm Wed 29 Jan 14

keith_l says...

Quote ---

Unison regional organiser Tim Roberts said: “The public expects key health services to be run by the NHS and not some private company that prioritises shareholder profit over patient care.”

Mr Roberts seems to be justifying the decision - non-emergency transport is NOT a key health services. Most patients would be able to make their own way to the hospital by private car or public transport. It is not for the NHS ambulance service, funded by our taxes, to pay for this.
Quote --- Unison regional organiser Tim Roberts said: “The public expects key health services to be run by the NHS and not some private company that prioritises shareholder profit over patient care.” Mr Roberts seems to be justifying the decision - non-emergency transport is NOT a key health services. Most patients would be able to make their own way to the hospital by private car or public transport. It is not for the NHS ambulance service, funded by our taxes, to pay for this. keith_l
  • Score: 2

3:59pm Wed 29 Jan 14

derekrob says...

keith_l wrote:
Quote ---

Unison regional organiser Tim Roberts said: “The public expects key health services to be run by the NHS and not some private company that prioritises shareholder profit over patient care.”

Mr Roberts seems to be justifying the decision - non-emergency transport is NOT a key health services. Most patients would be able to make their own way to the hospital by private car or public transport. It is not for the NHS ambulance service, funded by our taxes, to pay for this.
Non-emergency transport IS A KEY HEALTH SERVICE for wheelchair patients like me who have to attend dialysis sessions three times each week to remain alive. The same applies to those attending chemotherapy sessions.

If a private company can provide a better service than the existing NHS service then that is OK by me.
[quote][p][bold]keith_l[/bold] wrote: Quote --- Unison regional organiser Tim Roberts said: “The public expects key health services to be run by the NHS and not some private company that prioritises shareholder profit over patient care.” Mr Roberts seems to be justifying the decision - non-emergency transport is NOT a key health services. Most patients would be able to make their own way to the hospital by private car or public transport. It is not for the NHS ambulance service, funded by our taxes, to pay for this.[/p][/quote]Non-emergency transport IS A KEY HEALTH SERVICE for wheelchair patients like me who have to attend dialysis sessions three times each week to remain alive. The same applies to those attending chemotherapy sessions. If a private company can provide a better service than the existing NHS service then that is OK by me. derekrob
  • Score: -1

9:50pm Wed 29 Jan 14

pierre-pierre says...

ts nothing new, my wife used to go to St Barts Hospital for treatment, the Minibus in NHS garb used to also take other people, Thurrock, Harlow and Braintree,some times the journey was normally over two hours

The driver was not NHS he was a private contract driver.

and that was in 2006
ts nothing new, my wife used to go to St Barts Hospital for treatment, the Minibus in NHS garb used to also take other people, Thurrock, Harlow and Braintree,some times the journey was normally over two hours The driver was not NHS he was a private contract driver. and that was in 2006 pierre-pierre
  • Score: 0

9:54am Thu 30 Jan 14

keith_l says...

And my Dad used to drive for a charity in Devon doing the same thing in his private car, the patient made a contibution towards fuel and running costs.

If Derekrob is a wheelchair patient on dialysis then he should recieve either disability living allowance or attendance allowance from which he can contribute towards this.

There is no need for the NHS to pay for this.
And my Dad used to drive for a charity in Devon doing the same thing in his private car, the patient made a contibution towards fuel and running costs. If Derekrob is a wheelchair patient on dialysis then he should recieve either disability living allowance or attendance allowance from which he can contribute towards this. There is no need for the NHS to pay for this. keith_l
  • Score: -1

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