Wallet and sat nav stolen from insecure cars in Witham

Braintree and Witham Times: Wallet and sat nav stolen from insecure cars in Witham Wallet and sat nav stolen from insecure cars in Witham

Police have warned owners to keep their vehicles secure after thieves stole items from two cars in Witham.

A wallet containing cards and papers was stolen from a Peugeot 806 in Glebe Crescent between 10pm on January 15 and 7am on January 16.

A £100 TomTom was also taken from a vehicle in Orchid Avenue during a similar timeframe.

Comments (11)

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4:15pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Yellow Peril's Peril says...

it's UNsecure! The quality of grammar is so poor in the media these days.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if university degrees actually meant those graduating were at least above average in their field?
it's UNsecure! The quality of grammar is so poor in the media these days. Wouldn't it be wonderful if university degrees actually meant those graduating were at least above average in their field? Yellow Peril's Peril

5:30pm Sun 26 Jan 14

Jack222 says...

More to the point - am I meant to sympathise when people don't lock their cars...
More to the point - am I meant to sympathise when people don't lock their cars... Jack222

8:40pm Sun 26 Jan 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

If R Wozza ...

Oops, Better start again!

Were I to be a motor car left all alone in Glebe Crescent I would feel most insecure.

University of Life rules OK?
If R Wozza ... Oops, Better start again! Were I to be a motor car left all alone in Glebe Crescent I would feel most insecure. University of Life rules OK? OMPITA [Intl]

8:56pm Sun 26 Jan 14

pierre-pierre says...

Yellow Peril, have you a dictionary?

no such word as Unsecure

Insecure means not firm or firmly fixed
Yellow Peril, have you a dictionary? no such word as Unsecure Insecure means not firm or firmly fixed pierre-pierre

9:37pm Sun 26 Jan 14

pierre-pierre says...

from the Oxford dictionary

More definitions of unsecure
Definition of unsecure in:

The US English dictionary note Yankee
from the Oxford dictionary More definitions of unsecure Definition of unsecure in: The US English dictionary note Yankee pierre-pierre

12:12pm Mon 27 Jan 14

keith_l says...

People who (a) leave valuables such as wallets and satnavs in their cars, and (b) don't lock the car shouldn't be surprised to find said valuables no longer there. Yes, in an ideal world, all people would be honest, but this is not an ideal world.

BTW - the correct word for the headline should be "unsecured", or even simpler, "unlocked".
People who (a) leave valuables such as wallets and satnavs in their cars, and (b) don't lock the car shouldn't be surprised to find said valuables no longer there. Yes, in an ideal world, all people would be honest, but this is not an ideal world. BTW - the correct word for the headline should be "unsecured", or even simpler, "unlocked". keith_l

1:01pm Mon 27 Jan 14

pierre-pierre says...

Unsecured comes from the internet lot when describing Modems and WiFi

very recent printed Oxford and Collins dictionary only have insecure, and the definition meets the usage of the dreaded Brainless and Witless
Oxford Internet

Definition of unsecure in English:
unsecure
Line breaks: un|se¦cure
Pronunciation: /ʌnsɪˈkjʊə

, ʌnsɪˈkjɔː

/
adjective

1(especially of a computer system) not protected against attack or other criminal activity: an unsecure WiFi network

2(of a loan) unsecured: it’s easy to outspend your means, with credit cards and unsecure loans readily available

Insecure
2(of a thing) not firm or fixed; liable to give way or break: an insecure footbridge
More example sentences

By a cruel twist the town's All Saints' Church was locked for much of last week because one of its inner doors was insecure.
The buses banned immediately were found to have defective brakes, tyres, air leaks, insecure doors and seats.
Unsecured comes from the internet lot when describing Modems and WiFi very recent printed Oxford and Collins dictionary only have insecure, and the definition meets the usage of the dreaded Brainless and Witless Oxford Internet Definition of unsecure in English: unsecure Line breaks: un|se¦cure Pronunciation: /ʌnsɪˈkjʊə , ʌnsɪˈkjɔː / adjective 1(especially of a computer system) not protected against attack or other criminal activity: an unsecure WiFi network 2(of a loan) unsecured: it’s easy to outspend your means, with credit cards and unsecure loans readily available Insecure 2(of a thing) not firm or fixed; liable to give way or break: an insecure footbridge More example sentences By a cruel twist the town's All Saints' Church was locked for much of last week because one of its inner doors was insecure. The buses banned immediately were found to have defective brakes, tyres, air leaks, insecure doors and seats. pierre-pierre

4:03pm Mon 27 Jan 14

The Stinker Returns says...

Yellow Peril's Peril wrote:
it's UNsecure! The quality of grammar is so poor in the media these days.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if university degrees actually meant those graduating were at least above average in their field?
Who is this impersonator of the original Yellow Peril?
[quote][p][bold]Yellow Peril's Peril[/bold] wrote: it's UNsecure! The quality of grammar is so poor in the media these days. Wouldn't it be wonderful if university degrees actually meant those graduating were at least above average in their field?[/p][/quote]Who is this impersonator of the original Yellow Peril? The Stinker Returns

4:40pm Wed 29 Jan 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Pah -- I despair of my compatriots that would suggest I need remove my GPS device from my car every time I leave it. It behooves one -- from a simple,
common-sense POV -- to secure one's property, I'll concede -- but to remove all from within it?

We need OMPITA's Army of Sheriffs (aka "Dad's Army") to accost these reprobates and take appropriate measures when found their intentions have been or may be (thought police, anyone?) nefarious. P'rhaps rough 'em up a bit to enforce the point. You know, a stern word and a cuff round the lug-holes. That sort of response would soon call a halt to the rapscallions' misbehaviour.
Pah -- I despair of my compatriots that would suggest I need remove my GPS device from my car every time I leave it. It behooves one -- from a simple, common-sense POV -- to secure one's property, I'll concede -- but to remove all from within it? We need OMPITA's Army of Sheriffs (aka "Dad's Army") to accost these reprobates and take appropriate measures when found their intentions have been or may be (thought police, anyone?) nefarious. P'rhaps rough 'em up a bit to enforce the point. You know, a stern word and a cuff round the lug-holes. That sort of response would soon call a halt to the rapscallions' misbehaviour. /@|_|@\

4:48pm Wed 29 Jan 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Yellow Peril's Peril wrote:
it's UNsecure! The quality of grammar is so poor in the media these days.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if university degrees actually meant those graduating were at least above average in their field?
... and as for the above -- well. Having a degree (or graduating) means that you are IN the average of all those that graduated and, one might assume, in the same field. Dear, dear. Yet you display the temerity to criticise the (generally appalling, I will grant you) Brainless and Witless. That garnered a smile.

I think those graduating with a degree might well be above the average Joe sans a degree but then that too, is making all sorts of assumptions. The bottom line would seem to be that you are simply moaning and using a straw man or aunt Sally argument to substantiate something that really is meaningless.
[quote][p][bold]Yellow Peril's Peril[/bold] wrote: it's UNsecure! The quality of grammar is so poor in the media these days. Wouldn't it be wonderful if university degrees actually meant those graduating were at least above average in their field?[/p][/quote]... and as for the above -- well. Having a degree (or graduating) means that you are IN the average of all those that graduated and, one might assume, in the same field. Dear, dear. Yet you display the temerity to criticise the (generally appalling, I will grant you) Brainless and Witless. That garnered a smile. I think those graduating with a degree might well be above the average Joe sans a degree but then that too, is making all sorts of assumptions. The bottom line would seem to be that you are simply moaning and using a straw man or aunt Sally argument to substantiate something that really is meaningless. /@|_|@\

4:50pm Wed 29 Jan 14

/@|_|@\ says...

pierre-pierre wrote:
from the Oxford dictionary

More definitions of unsecure
Definition of unsecure in:

The US English dictionary note Yankee
Another fallacious comment. The US English Dictionarys (which one, BTW? There are several.) do NOT simply define spellings and definitions of words used above the Mason Dixon line. You ought to know that, Frenchie!
[quote][p][bold]pierre-pierre[/bold] wrote: from the Oxford dictionary More definitions of unsecure Definition of unsecure in: The US English dictionary note Yankee[/p][/quote]Another fallacious comment. The US English Dictionarys (which one, BTW? There are several.) do NOT simply define spellings and definitions of words used above the Mason Dixon line. You ought to know that, Frenchie! /@|_|@\

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