Essex: 1,200 already breathalysed for December campaign

Braintree and Witham Times: Essex: 1,200 already breathalysed for December campaign Essex: 1,200 already breathalysed for December campaign

Essex Police is warning motorists not to even think about drink driving.

A force spokesman said: "Essex Police takes the issue of drink driving seriously all year round.

"However during December and the New Year period officers make a concerted effort to crack down on the crime to ensure that people across the county have a Christmas to remember for the right reasons.

Casualty Reduction Manager Adam Pipe said: "The message from Essex Police is don’t take the chance as drink driving can have devastating consequences. Make sure you arrange your lift home in advance, whether it is by train, bus, taxi or a designated driver. Don’t drive if you are going to have a drink.”

As part of the campaign officers will be: • patrolling both in town centres and in rural areas, especially the places where drivers think they are less likely to get caught • focussing on particular areas on particular nights, using automatic number plate recognition equipment to target people who have committed offences or who are driving vehicles that have previously come to police notice • working closely with CCTV operators in town and city centres so if somebody is seen leaving a pub and club and spotted on camera as being intoxicated and they then get into the driver’s seat of the car, police will be alerted Residents are also being asked to help police to keep the county’s roads safe by reporting people who they know drink and drive. They can call 999, 101 or make an anonymous call to Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

Mr Pipe added: "Drink driving is taking a risk, not only with your own life but those of your passengers and other innocent people on the road. It can result in a criminal record, the loss your driving licence or a fine of up to £5000. If you kill or injure someone you could face up to 14 years in prison.”

During December last year 3,263 people were breathalysed, 126 were found to be over the legal limit of 35 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath.

This year (from December 1 to 11) Essex Police has so far carried out 1,271 breath tests, resulting in 35 arrests of people who were over the limit.

Last Monday, police forces across East Anglia and Lotus Cars joined together to present a united front against drink driving.

Lotus is working with the region’s police by providing a fully liveried Lotus Evora S to help officers engage with drivers and spread the word about the Fatal Four driving behaviours*, which include drink driving.

*Fatal Four driving behaviours are drink driving; speeding; not wearing a seatbelt; and driving whilst using a mobile phone.

Comments (15)

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9:56pm Thu 12 Dec 13

/@|_|@\ says...

It strikes me that this is another example of the overly aggressive police farce. Sorry, force. They stop three and quarter thousand cars with an arrest rate of just below four percent with a less-than three percent ROI so far this year. Reminds me of using a steam hammer to crack a nut. And that's not to mention the cost both financial and societal: they (further) lose respect from their bullying attitudes and patent lack of grounded justification and the neighbourhoods suffer from lack of local patrols. There seems to be profiling at work too: they are pulling cars with those that "have committed offences or who are driving vehicles that have previously come to police notice". That is, in my opinion, outrageous! What happened to innocent until proven guilty? My earlier shoplifting offence has nothing to do with my current sobriety! Are we to be subjected to the thought police too because I might've THOUGHT about getting into the car after a scoof full?

Another issue that warrants consideration is the last statement that lists talking on a mobile the fourth largest contributor to fatalities whilst driving. I'd seriously question this and also demand that the stats be provided AND reviewed by an independent body before this sort of hyperbole is spewed. I do not think drinking and driving or talking on the phone whilst driving are particularly efficacious behaviours but let's not get irrational about this. And let's NOT be pre-judged by jack-booted and arrogant police that more and more resemble what they really are migrating towards - armed militia. Just like in Amerika.
It strikes me that this is another example of the overly aggressive police farce. Sorry, force. They stop three and quarter thousand cars with an arrest rate of just below four percent with a less-than three percent ROI so far this year. Reminds me of using a steam hammer to crack a nut. And that's not to mention the cost both financial and societal: they (further) lose respect from their bullying attitudes and patent lack of grounded justification and the neighbourhoods suffer from lack of local patrols. There seems to be profiling at work too: they are pulling cars with those that "have committed offences or who are driving vehicles that have previously come to police notice". That is, in my opinion, outrageous! What happened to innocent until proven guilty? My earlier shoplifting offence has nothing to do with my current sobriety! Are we to be subjected to the thought police too because I might've THOUGHT about getting into the car after a scoof full? Another issue that warrants consideration is the last statement that lists talking on a mobile the fourth largest contributor to fatalities whilst driving. I'd seriously question this and also demand that the stats be provided AND reviewed by an independent body before this sort of hyperbole is spewed. I do not think drinking and driving or talking on the phone whilst driving are particularly efficacious behaviours but let's not get irrational about this. And let's NOT be pre-judged by jack-booted and arrogant police that more and more resemble what they really are migrating towards - armed militia. Just like in Amerika. /@|_|@\

9:56pm Thu 12 Dec 13

Jack222 says...

Would be more sensible if they were allowed to park themselves outside pubs like in Australia but they are not allowed to do that as I understand it...
Would be more sensible if they were allowed to park themselves outside pubs like in Australia but they are not allowed to do that as I understand it... Jack222

6:56am Fri 13 Dec 13

Meherenow says...

If, during the Christmas and New Year period, our police force can be extra proactive in clamping down on the so called fatal four, why can't they adopt this approach over the entire year. Personally, I'm fed up with the dozens of drivers I see on a daily basis flouting the 'Do not use your hand held mobile phone whilst driving' and the reckless young drivers in their sooped up cars who use Park Drive and Limebrook Way as drag strips. During the rest of the year you are lucky of you see a police patrol car at all unless it's parked in a supermarket car park.
If, during the Christmas and New Year period, our police force can be extra proactive in clamping down on the so called fatal four, why can't they adopt this approach over the entire year. Personally, I'm fed up with the dozens of drivers I see on a daily basis flouting the 'Do not use your hand held mobile phone whilst driving' and the reckless young drivers in their sooped up cars who use Park Drive and Limebrook Way as drag strips. During the rest of the year you are lucky of you see a police patrol car at all unless it's parked in a supermarket car park. Meherenow

7:52am Fri 13 Dec 13

Bhudeeka says...

totally agree Meherenow
totally agree Meherenow Bhudeeka

2:22pm Fri 13 Dec 13

/@|_|@\ says...

Parking outside of a pub is wrong. It wastes valuable police time, it drives away business and makes the presumption that the public is irresponsible and unable to police itself. Some members of the public do indeed fall into that category but it is disingenuous and patronising to presume we all are. It also simply feeds further into the mindset that assumes a public that allows and welcomes a nanny state attitude, removing the individuality of its members.

And I resent that with a passion.
Parking outside of a pub is wrong. It wastes valuable police time, it drives away business and makes the presumption that the public is irresponsible and unable to police itself. Some members of the public do indeed fall into that category but it is disingenuous and patronising to presume we all are. It also simply feeds further into the mindset that assumes a public that allows and welcomes a nanny state attitude, removing the individuality of its members. And I resent that with a passion. /@|_|@\

1:51am Sat 14 Dec 13

e5mitch says...

Yet despite targeting known offenders using modern technology like ANPR & CCTV, & utilising tip offs from the public their detection rate is less than 3%.
Still at least they get to smoke around in a lotus!!
Yet despite targeting known offenders using modern technology like ANPR & CCTV, & utilising tip offs from the public their detection rate is less than 3%. Still at least they get to smoke around in a lotus!! e5mitch

5:52pm Sat 14 Dec 13

/@|_|@\ says...

But what is the connection between ANPR and drunk driving? None. You conflate the two when they are separate.
But what is the connection between ANPR and drunk driving? None. You conflate the two when they are separate. /@|_|@\

7:44pm Sat 14 Dec 13

pierre-pierre says...

Tuesday Evening and Wed morning, thick fog, five cars seen without the RH lights working, managed to talk to three when parked at traffic lights.

Can see a car nearly every day with one headlight out, nearly ad dangerous as drunk driving
Tuesday Evening and Wed morning, thick fog, five cars seen without the RH lights working, managed to talk to three when parked at traffic lights. Can see a car nearly every day with one headlight out, nearly ad dangerous as drunk driving pierre-pierre

10:11am Sun 15 Dec 13

OMPITA [Intl] says...

I've been stopped and breathalysed twice.

It didn't cause me to loose any respect for the police whatsoever, in fact quite the opposite.

On both occasions they were courteous and gave very good and understandable reasons for having stopped me. The fact that I was stone cold sober each time caused me no resentment at all.

I am all for random spot checks without any obvious justification and I fail to see why any normal law abiding person should think differently. Bring them on I say!

Apart from the Undertakers and Florists I can't think who else might actually be disadvantaged.
I've been stopped and breathalysed twice. It didn't cause me to loose any respect for the police whatsoever, in fact quite the opposite. On both occasions they were courteous and gave very good and understandable reasons for having stopped me. The fact that I was stone cold sober each time caused me no resentment at all. I am all for random spot checks without any obvious justification and I fail to see why any normal law abiding person should think differently. Bring them on I say! Apart from the Undertakers and Florists I can't think who else might actually be disadvantaged. OMPITA [Intl]

1:31pm Sun 15 Dec 13

pierre-pierre says...

had three checks so far

one near Heathrow, had a shunt at a pedestrina crossing, so had a clear breathe test

Another near Stansted on A120, late at night Police checking all cars, again clear

Cant remember where I had the third, but that is also clear.

Doesnt worry me, I do drink wine, but not when driving, got a very old licence with only one blemish for speeding, 40 in a 30 area.
had three checks so far one near Heathrow, had a shunt at a pedestrina crossing, so had a clear breathe test Another near Stansted on A120, late at night Police checking all cars, again clear Cant remember where I had the third, but that is also clear. Doesnt worry me, I do drink wine, but not when driving, got a very old licence with only one blemish for speeding, 40 in a 30 area. pierre-pierre

3:25pm Tue 17 Dec 13

/@|_|@\ says...

I, too, have been stopped and tested and was sober. I also should state I have utmost respect for the majority of officers and -- I think all but one or two of -- those that I personally have met. It is the institutionalised attitude that I question and resent.

Additionally, I can not for the life of me see how one can equate a busted headlight with drunk driving: that's a helluva stretch there, Frenchy!
I, too, have been stopped and tested and was sober. I also should state I have utmost respect for the majority of officers and -- I think all but one or two of -- those that I personally have met. It is the institutionalised attitude that I question and resent. Additionally, I can not for the life of me see how one can equate a busted headlight with drunk driving: that's a helluva stretch there, Frenchy! /@|_|@\

3:48pm Tue 17 Dec 13

keith_l says...

Why do some of the above reports criticise the Police?

The villains of this story are the drink drivers, and also those people who drink with them knowing that they are going to drive home (often buying them drinks and encouraging them to have one for the road).

In pure scientific terms the amount of alcohol in your body affects your driving by (a) reducing your reaction times and (b) giving you a false bravado that encourages you to take risks.

One unit per measure of spirits or small glass of wine. Two units for large glasses of wine, pints of weak beer and bottles of strong lager. Three or more units for pints of beer over 4%. Depending on your body weight and composition, three to five units will fail a breath or blood test. It takes the average body one hour per unit to break down the alcohol. However, the experts say that even one unit left in your bloodstream is enough to affect your driving ability.
Why do some of the above reports criticise the Police? The villains of this story are the drink drivers, and also those people who drink with them knowing that they are going to drive home (often buying them drinks and encouraging them to have one for the road). In pure scientific terms the amount of alcohol in your body affects your driving by (a) reducing your reaction times and (b) giving you a false bravado that encourages you to take risks. One unit per measure of spirits or small glass of wine. Two units for large glasses of wine, pints of weak beer and bottles of strong lager. Three or more units for pints of beer over 4%. Depending on your body weight and composition, three to five units will fail a breath or blood test. It takes the average body one hour per unit to break down the alcohol. However, the experts say that even one unit left in your bloodstream is enough to affect your driving ability. keith_l

9:50pm Tue 17 Dec 13

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Spot on 'keith_I'

You are so right! The 'drink drivers' (and all too often their ‘accessories after the fact') are the villains of the plot – let’s not lose sight of that.

Who are the police? Just stop and think for a moment. They are the people who we as a society club together to pay for (i.e. via our taxes) to do our dirty work for us at all hours of the day, under all conditions, and often at great personal risk. We should be da*n grateful for their unswerving commitment.

If anyone is unhappy about how well the police perform then why don't they volunteer their own services in one form or another to make a positive contribution towards improving the service instead of constantly and fecklessly carping inanely from the side-lines as they do?

They might think it’s fashionable among their low life low-intellect peers to constantly whine and senselessly criticise, but they'd have a hell of lot more to complain about if there were no police at all!

I strongly suspect anyway that much of the insidious puerile anti-police sniping is nothing more than the sour grapes jealous reaction of those who perhaps secretly aspired to a career in the police - but the realities of their physical or mental limitations put paid to any such dreams.
Spot on 'keith_I' You are so right! The 'drink drivers' (and all too often their ‘accessories after the fact') are the villains of the plot – let’s not lose sight of that. Who are the police? Just stop and think for a moment. They are the people who we as a society club together to pay for (i.e. via our taxes) to do our dirty work for us at all hours of the day, under all conditions, and often at great personal risk. We should be da*n grateful for their unswerving commitment. If anyone is unhappy about how well the police perform then why don't they volunteer their own services in one form or another to make a positive contribution towards improving the service instead of constantly and fecklessly carping inanely from the side-lines as they do? They might think it’s fashionable among their low life low-intellect peers to constantly whine and senselessly criticise, but they'd have a hell of lot more to complain about if there were no police at all! I strongly suspect anyway that much of the insidious puerile anti-police sniping is nothing more than the sour grapes jealous reaction of those who perhaps secretly aspired to a career in the police - but the realities of their physical or mental limitations put paid to any such dreams. OMPITA [Intl]

10:08pm Tue 17 Dec 13

/@|_|@\ says...

Oh never mind: I'm not very good tat this apparently. I'm getting the wrong message across so I've no more to contribute here. Must be the enormous volume of strong ale I consumed last evening. I suppose taking Ambien on top of that doesn't really help much.

Regardless, I will agree with one poster: I was indeed very grateful to the ol' Bill last night -- they kept a low profile at ye olde doughnut shoppe and so I got home just fine. Again. Phew!

Happy Christmas occifers!
Oh never mind: I'm not very good tat this apparently. I'm getting the wrong message across so I've no more to contribute here. Must be the enormous volume of strong ale I consumed last evening. I suppose taking Ambien on top of that doesn't really help much. Regardless, I will agree with one poster: I was indeed very grateful to the ol' Bill last night -- they kept a low profile at ye olde doughnut shoppe and so I got home just fine. Again. Phew! Happy Christmas occifers! /@|_|@\

11:11pm Tue 17 Dec 13

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Ah, good old Ambien. I swear by it!

Trying to get a good night’s kip in here is hopeless. If big Charlie ain’t up and down the ladder to and from the top bunk once, he’s up and down it a dozen times a night. Creaking and squeaking; thumping and bumping - he drives me bl**dy crazy. I never to get sleep more than half an hour before he’s off on another of his nocturnal jaunts to the heads.

Still, I’ve told the quack about my sleep problems and convinced him to give me 25 milligrams of Ambien every Friday. Fantastic stuff! It works perfectly.

I tip the lot into Charlies mug of Milo and he sleeps through the night like a baby - and I get to wake up every Saturday morning like a new man!

As for Charlie we've given him a new nickname ‘Zolpidem’. Of course he’s gone and confused it with ‘Zorro’ and taken to wearing a black hat, mask and cape. They had to take a broom handle off of the silly old sod yesterday because was swinging it around like swordsman possessed of the devil.

Only three nights to go!
Ah, good old Ambien. I swear by it! Trying to get a good night’s kip in here is hopeless. If big Charlie ain’t up and down the ladder to and from the top bunk once, he’s up and down it a dozen times a night. Creaking and squeaking; thumping and bumping - he drives me bl**dy crazy. I never to get sleep more than half an hour before he’s off on another of his nocturnal jaunts to the heads. Still, I’ve told the quack about my sleep problems and convinced him to give me 25 milligrams of Ambien every Friday. Fantastic stuff! It works perfectly. I tip the lot into Charlies mug of Milo and he sleeps through the night like a baby - and I get to wake up every Saturday morning like a new man! As for Charlie we've given him a new nickname ‘Zolpidem’. Of course he’s gone and confused it with ‘Zorro’ and taken to wearing a black hat, mask and cape. They had to take a broom handle off of the silly old sod yesterday because was swinging it around like swordsman possessed of the devil. Only three nights to go! OMPITA [Intl]

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