Braintree: One in four children in poverty in four wards

Braintree and Witham Times: The End Child Poverty Campaign says too many children are living below the breadline The End Child Poverty Campaign says too many children are living below the breadline

More than a quarter of children in two Braintree neighbourhoods are living below the breadline.

Figures from the End Child Poverty Campaign show Braintree East and Bocking South have the highest child poverty levels in the district.

One in four children in Witham West and Witham North were also found to be living in poverty.

Researchers classed poor families as those receiving unemployment benefit or working tax credits, where their income was less than 60 per cent of the average.

It is also based on local unemployment figures.

Comments (10)

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4:57pm Tue 26 Feb 13

howwhy says...

DISGUSTING !
DISGUSTING ! howwhy
  • Score: 0

9:26am Wed 27 Feb 13

The Blue Frog says...

How come then that these people have the latest flat screen TVs and drive better cars than me?
How come then that these people have the latest flat screen TVs and drive better cars than me? The Blue Frog
  • Score: -2

1:32pm Wed 27 Feb 13

Witham1901 says...

The Blue Frog wrote:
How come then that these people have the latest flat screen TVs and drive better cars than me?
Agree with you completely!
[quote][p][bold]The Blue Frog[/bold] wrote: How come then that these people have the latest flat screen TVs and drive better cars than me?[/p][/quote]Agree with you completely! Witham1901
  • Score: 0

2:27pm Wed 27 Feb 13

sKorch says...

Interesting..
Since the National Average Pay is £26,500, anyone on benefits who doesn't rake in £15,900 from the Taxpayer is classified as "being in poverty".?????Well forgive me for having a laugh......I am not going to give my hard-earned money to people who can't earn more than £15,900.
Interesting.. Since the National Average Pay is £26,500, anyone on benefits who doesn't rake in £15,900 from the Taxpayer is classified as "being in poverty".?????Well forgive me for having a laugh......I am not going to give my hard-earned money to people who can't earn more than £15,900. sKorch
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Wed 27 Feb 13

lewis911 says...

Its the SKY Tv with sports and iphones that upsets me. I can't afford them but then I'm not on benefits.

Just what constitutes child poverty these days, I always thought it was not being able to provide a square meal, a roof over their heads and appropriate clothing.
Its the SKY Tv with sports and iphones that upsets me. I can't afford them but then I'm not on benefits. Just what constitutes child poverty these days, I always thought it was not being able to provide a square meal, a roof over their heads and appropriate clothing. lewis911
  • Score: 1

11:25am Thu 28 Feb 13

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Poverty – What’s that when it’s all about then?

Born in 1943 I grew up in Braintree.

Until I left home in 1959 we never had a TV, Refrigerator, Central Heating, Car, Washing Machine or any of the myriad of other modern day paraphernalia that is now assumed to be such a God given right to all and sundry irrespective of what contribution to society in general they are prepared to offer in return.

Never once in all those years was there a family holiday of any sort.
Summer excursions were daily trips to Rose Hill Swimming Baths – walking there of course. ‘Bought in’ entertainment consisted of Comics like the Beano and Dandy and if really lucky, a sixpenny trip to Saturday Morning Pictures at the Central Cinema in High Street. That was really ‘pushing the boat out’ although I never did achieve the ultimate luxury of being able to buy half a choc ice from the kind lady who used to carry a knife on her tray for the express purpose slicing them in two for joint ownership purchasers.

Trainers were unheard of. At age 13 I had a pair of ‘Wellie Boots’ and that was it. How vividly I recall the chilblains that accompanied them during the winter months.

I hankered for my own wrist watch – especially one with a Mickey Mouse face. It was not to be, but at age fourteen I did receive a ‘sensible’ pocket watch with a luminous dial. Wow, that really was high tech!

It was just accepted that luxurious things like ‘sliced bread’ and ‘shop cakes’ were for the likes of ‘the posh people’ who lived in places like Clare Road and Courtauld Road.

Educated - sorry, I mean subjected to days of abject terror - in Braintree’s fine academic institutions, initially Manor Street Infant and Junior Schools and then that Psychopathic Madhouse more commonly known at the time as Panfield Lane Secondary Modern School I finally emerged upon an unsuspecting world with a GCE in English Language and Surveying.

Not finding any career openings for budding authors of books on surveying, my life took off in other directions which I do not seek to elucidate on at this particular moment.

All I want to say right now is that at no time during my formative years did I, nor I am sure did my equally motley peers, ever look upon ourselves as being ‘IN POVERTY’.

These people today who claim to be suffering from poverty in this country are clueless. They just do not have any understanding of the real meaning of the word. If they woke up and took a look at what life is like in some of the third world countries they might realise that what they are suffering from is not ‘Poverty’ but ‘Avarice’.

A couple of years ago I was brought to the point of tears when talking to a a man in a Philippine village who had recently lost his 12 year old daughter because he just didn’t have the means of raising the small change necessary to get her to a clinic a few miles away where she could have been treated for the dehydration that killed her. That is Poverty!!!

The attitude of these whingeing ‘do gooders’ or whatever they call themselves is just one more indication of the terminal decline afflicting the UK.

It’s time we clawed our way back to reality before it’s too late!
Poverty – What’s that when it’s all about then? Born in 1943 I grew up in Braintree. Until I left home in 1959 we never had a TV, Refrigerator, Central Heating, Car, Washing Machine or any of the myriad of other modern day paraphernalia that is now assumed to be such a God given right to all and sundry irrespective of what contribution to society in general they are prepared to offer in return. Never once in all those years was there a family holiday of any sort. Summer excursions were daily trips to Rose Hill Swimming Baths – walking there of course. ‘Bought in’ entertainment consisted of Comics like the Beano and Dandy and if really lucky, a sixpenny trip to Saturday Morning Pictures at the Central Cinema in High Street. That was really ‘pushing the boat out’ although I never did achieve the ultimate luxury of being able to buy half a choc ice from the kind lady who used to carry a knife on her tray for the express purpose slicing them in two for joint ownership purchasers. Trainers were unheard of. At age 13 I had a pair of ‘Wellie Boots’ and that was it. How vividly I recall the chilblains that accompanied them during the winter months. I hankered for my own wrist watch – especially one with a Mickey Mouse face. It was not to be, but at age fourteen I did receive a ‘sensible’ pocket watch with a luminous dial. Wow, that really was high tech! It was just accepted that luxurious things like ‘sliced bread’ and ‘shop cakes’ were for the likes of ‘the posh people’ who lived in places like Clare Road and Courtauld Road. Educated - sorry, I mean subjected to days of abject terror - in Braintree’s fine academic institutions, initially Manor Street Infant and Junior Schools and then that Psychopathic Madhouse more commonly known at the time as Panfield Lane Secondary Modern School I finally emerged upon an unsuspecting world with a GCE in English Language and Surveying. Not finding any career openings for budding authors of books on surveying, my life took off in other directions which I do not seek to elucidate on at this particular moment. All I want to say right now is that at no time during my formative years did I, nor I am sure did my equally motley peers, ever look upon ourselves as being ‘IN POVERTY’. These people today who claim to be suffering from poverty in this country are clueless. They just do not have any understanding of the real meaning of the word. If they woke up and took a look at what life is like in some of the third world countries they might realise that what they are suffering from is not ‘Poverty’ but ‘Avarice’. A couple of years ago I was brought to the point of tears when talking to a a man in a Philippine village who had recently lost his 12 year old daughter because he just didn’t have the means of raising the small change necessary to get her to a clinic a few miles away where she could have been treated for the dehydration that killed her. That is Poverty!!! The attitude of these whingeing ‘do gooders’ or whatever they call themselves is just one more indication of the terminal decline afflicting the UK. It’s time we clawed our way back to reality before it’s too late! OMPITA [Intl]
  • Score: 0

5:33pm Thu 28 Feb 13

montygirl says...

I agree with the above and also question the use of the word poverty.There are genuine poverty cases in this country and often in households where parents work.However some kids without food and live in genuine poverty as parents have their priorities wrong and prefer to spend the money they get often from the state on smoking,drink and do drugs over that of looking after their kids . Plus as has been said before how do some not all on state benefits end up having the best tv's,iphone etc when others who work and get a modest income cannot afford what are deemed as luxuries.The fault is with the system. Work should pay and enough to support hard working families.Plus the immigration card is red herring as if the people of this country did those jobs there would not be a need there.As was said if you can afford food,shelter and clothing then you are not in poverty.no iphone,holidays,big tv's,endless electrical gadgets are luxuries which i think sometimes people forget.
I agree with the above and also question the use of the word poverty.There are genuine poverty cases in this country and often in households where parents work.However some kids without food and live in genuine poverty as parents have their priorities wrong and prefer to spend the money they get often from the state on smoking,drink and do drugs over that of looking after their kids . Plus as has been said before how do some not all on state benefits end up having the best tv's,iphone etc when others who work and get a modest income cannot afford what are deemed as luxuries.The fault is with the system. Work should pay and enough to support hard working families.Plus the immigration card is red herring as if the people of this country did those jobs there would not be a need there.As was said if you can afford food,shelter and clothing then you are not in poverty.no iphone,holidays,big tv's,endless electrical gadgets are luxuries which i think sometimes people forget. montygirl
  • Score: 0

8:27pm Thu 28 Feb 13

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Montygirl hits upon a very salient point when she draws attention to the children that suffer due to parental fecklessness.

Yes, these poor kids may be suffering from poverty, but this should not automatically be viewed as a result of society failing to throw enough money towards the family unit, but rather as a result of gross neglect by those immediately responsible for looking after them. In these cases simply providing additional funds would quite likely boost the profits of pubs, bookies, and drug dealers etc instead of enhancing the affected kids’ quality of life one iota.

I think a simple litmus test for Poverty would be to list everything that is perceived as being wanted. Go through that list honestly deleting items than can only be categorised as being ‘desirable’, thus leaving those that are genuinely ‘essential’. Then check whether the income is sufficient to cover the essential items only. If it isn’t then thought should be given to identifying suitable cheaper alternatives.

Only when having properly gone through that process should thoughts turn towards declaring a state of poverty.
Montygirl hits upon a very salient point when she draws attention to the children that suffer due to parental fecklessness. Yes, these poor kids may be suffering from poverty, but this should not automatically be viewed as a result of society failing to throw enough money towards the family unit, but rather as a result of gross neglect by those immediately responsible for looking after them. In these cases simply providing additional funds would quite likely boost the profits of pubs, bookies, and drug dealers etc instead of enhancing the affected kids’ quality of life one iota. I think a simple litmus test for Poverty would be to list everything that is perceived as being wanted. Go through that list honestly deleting items than can only be categorised as being ‘desirable’, thus leaving those that are genuinely ‘essential’. Then check whether the income is sufficient to cover the essential items only. If it isn’t then thought should be given to identifying suitable cheaper alternatives. Only when having properly gone through that process should thoughts turn towards declaring a state of poverty. OMPITA [Intl]
  • Score: 0

7:02am Sat 2 Mar 13

keith_l says...

So, that would be 60% of average income, no rent or mortgage to pay and no commuting to work to pay for - this alone costs me over £4k per year so I have to earn £6k to cover it.
So, that would be 60% of average income, no rent or mortgage to pay and no commuting to work to pay for - this alone costs me over £4k per year so I have to earn £6k to cover it. keith_l
  • Score: 0

5:28pm Mon 4 Mar 13

kevinandperry says...

i work and struggle like hell and see all these poor people out of work with designer clothes and all hi tec stuff which i can not afford and i work ...something wrong here i think
i work and struggle like hell and see all these poor people out of work with designer clothes and all hi tec stuff which i can not afford and i work ...something wrong here i think kevinandperry
  • Score: 0

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